A more efficient and faster type of random access memory (RAM) cells invented

Dynamic Random Access Memory (DRAM). Part 1: Memory Cell Arrays

A more efficient and faster type of random access memory (RAM) cells invented

Scientists have developed a new low-power storage device that will create faster, more efficient components of random access memory (RAM), and can work with ternary number system.

Almost all modern digital devices that process information require dynamic random access memory for temporary storage of data and intermediate results of operations performed. DRAM speed is important because it affects the performance of the entire system. These chips consist of separate memory cells, the characteristics of which determine the performance of an integrated circuit..

Although the existing hardware is doing its job well enough, a team of researchers from Tokyo Institute of Technology decided to create a more efficient memory device., which uses less energy and can work faster than current analogues.

They developed a new type of cell composed of layers of lithium, lithium phosphate and nickel. These are essentially tiny, low-capacity, thin-film batteries that can be quickly switched between charged and discharged states..

A more efficient and faster type of random access memory (RAM) cells invented

Tests have shown that during operation, a thin oxide layer forms between the nickel and lithium phosphate layers, which allows the device to switch at low current energy levels, which significantly increases its energy efficiency and speed..

Moreover, this type of cell can store three voltage states instead of two, which also makes it possible to work effectively with the ternary number system..

Development by Japanese researchers paves the way for faster, smaller and more energy-efficient computing devices of the future.

We also previously reported on development of construction technology semiconductor integrated circuits operating in a triple logic system.

text: Ilya Bauer, photo: Tokyo Institute of Technology, appcube